Installing Wedge Anchors

Installing Wedge Anchors in Concrete

Wedge anchors are fasteners designed for use in masonry materials (most commonly concrete) and used to secure materials and equipment. Concrete wedge anchors are designed to go into a pre-drilled hole and expand, creating a grip so they cannot be “pulled out” or removed. Today we will be reviewing the proper installation of a post base into a concrete floor.



What will you need?

Before we begin let’s make sure we have the proper tools for the job.

Step One

The first thing you need to do when installing a wedge anchor is choose the proper anchor material. Wedge anchors come in many materials and all serve different purposes. Stainless steel and hot dip galvanized are two very popular wedge anchor materials, but the correct material varies by application. Not sure what material you need? Check out our Material Guide to learn about all the different materials available.

wedge anchors

Step Two

Once you’ve chosen a material, its time to get your drill ready. When installing a wedge anchor, it’s important to have a minimum of 2-1/2 inches embedded into the concrete. There should also be at least an inch exposed, enough for the attaching material to grab onto. To measure ours, we placed the wedge anchor about an inch below the tip of the SDS drill bit and then used blue painters tape to mark off the drill where we should stop drilling.  Marking the stop point with blue tape will allow you to drill consistent holes and prevent you from over/under drilling.

Step Three

drilling into concrete

Now that we’ve applied our drill bit with tape, its time to begin the drilling. BUT NOT SO FAST. First we need to put on our safety goggles and gloves, always wear safety gear when cutting. Now that you are safe and ready to work, simply apply pressure to the place you want to drill and let the bit begin to do its work. Once your drill bit reaches the blue painters tape, you will know that the hole has reached the necessary depth and you can stop drilling.

Step Four

hammering in wedge anchorsCarefully brush away any of the debris from drilling to clear the hole and begin installation of the anchor. The next step is to insert the masonry anchor into the hole. It should be a very tight fit and will need to be hammered into place. The end result should leave about an inch (or more depending on how much room you need) above the surface to allow for anchoring.

wedge anchor ready for post base

Now that the anchor is installed we can apply the post base, square washer, and nut to the wedge anchor. After placing them on, you screw the nut onto the wedge anchor creating a strong, sturdy anchoring station. Now that you’ve completed the installation, take a step back and admire your handiwork. This post base is now ready for the next step in your building project.

ratcheting on postbase                     Anchored postbase

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Bolts Vs Screws

Whats The Difference Between A Bolt And A Screw?

It’s a question we hear surprisingly often. Since they are commonly used interchangeably, you might think they are the same. However, there are distinct differences that make a bolt and screw different.

Bolts Vs. Screws20170811_144120

Bolts:

A bolt is a fastener with threads and a head that is intended and designed to be used (installed) with a nut. Bolts are not intended to hold themselves into a material and rely on that nut to provide the holding tension needed. A bolt must protrude from the other side of a material in order to be fastened. Bolts are more commonly used with washers than screws.

Screws:

IMG_0538

Screws are also a threaded faster, but can either have a head or lack one entirely, (ex. set screw). Screws are designed to be installed in a pre-drilled hole, or they are engineered to tap their own hole with the threading while being installed. They do not use a nut and secure themselves by being tightened into their hole. Screws are not meant to appear on the opposite side of the material they are being drilled into, even though you will often see screws poking through roofs and wood. While they are less often used with washers, it is common to see finishing cup washers used to make a clean finished look for flat head and oval head screws.

“That’s Not What Your Site Says”

Although we go over the differences here, you will notice Albany County Fasteners uses “bolt” and “screw” somewhat interchangeably on the website. We do this because sometimes a product is better known by a different name that may not be  it’s “formal” name, but we speak your language and we want to help you find it. For example, a Lag Screw is sometimes referred to as a Lag Bolt; this is for customer convenience as it is more commonly, informally called a lag bolt than a lag screw.



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Hex Cap Screws Vs Hex Tap Bolts

Hex Cap Screws vs Hex Tap Bolts: What’s The Difference?

Hex bolts, hex caps, hex taps, hex heads…there is so much hex bolt lingo.

Hex Cap Screw Partially Threaded Shoulder Hex Tap Bolt Fully Threaded

Hex bolts can be very confusing. Its one of those situations where you may order a hex cap screw and wind up with a hex tap bolt. A hex cap is sometimes a hex tap, and Albany County Fasteners would like to take some time today to explain the details of hex bolts to you. It’s all about the threading, the length and the shoulder.



Hex Bolts

Hex Bolts are bolts with external threading and a hex head designed to be driven by a wrench. Hex bolts may be partially threaded or fully threaded, and are available in hex cap (partially threaded after a certain length) and hex tap (always fully threaded). Hex caps and hex taps are both considered “hex bolts”. Hex bolts are designed to be inserted into holes with machined, tapped threads, they are available in coarse thread (UNC) and fine thread (UNF).  Machine screw sizes (diameters #4 – #12) of hex bolts are known as “trim head hex screws” and are always fully threaded.

20170804_092325

Hex Cap Screws / Hex Cap Bolts

Hex cap screws may have a built-in shoulder (un-threaded area under the head) which increases tensile strength of the bolt. However, the threaded length of these screws may be limited and therefore, they are not suitable for all applications. Cap screws are typically fully threaded up to 1-1/4″, hex cap bolts over this length are almost always partially threaded. Hex cap screws are available in diameters 1/4″ and up. Browse our selection of hex cap screws.

 

Hex Tap Bolts

Hex Tap Bolts

Tap Bolts on the other hand are fully threaded regardless of size. This means the threading goes from the tip all the way to the underside of the head of the bolt. They have a weaker tensile strength but the extended threads make them more suitable for situations where hex cap screws may not function well. Hex tap bolts are available in diameters 1/4″ and up. Browse our selection of hex tap bolts.

In Summary

Tap bolts have threading all the way down regardless of their size. Hex cap screws may have a shoulder in longer sizes, which makes them stronger. Both are typically installed with a nut and designed to be driven by a wrench or socket driver. And last but not least, if a hex cap screw is small enough to lose its shoulder it can also be considered a tap bolt. In smaller sizes, they are the same but once a unthreaded shoulder starts, become different bolts. Browse our entire selection of hex bolts.



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