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How To Replace A Utility Box Cutter Knife Blade

How To Replace A Utility Box Cutter Knife Blade

Box Cutter Pre Blade Replacement

The box cutter, or utility knife, is an excellent tool found in almost every warehouse. Designed with a small blade, these knives have the ability to quickly cut cardboard boxes open, remove packing tape and other wrappings used in freight transit. Due to the abuse box cutters take, they are often made from very hard plastic or metal.

Many warehouse employees view utility knives as throwaway items. As soon as the blades wear out warehouse workers will typically begin looking for a new one. Fortunately, you’re company does not need to waste money repeatedly buying new box cutters every week. A simple remedy is just to replace the blade. And the best part? They normally come with extras!

Opening The Utility Knife Opening the utility knife

The first step when replacing a box cutter blade is to figure out how it opens. In our example, we only need to use a Phillips head screwdriver and remove one screw from the side. After removing the screw you can simply pop the top off which splits the knife in half.




Identifying Components

There are really only five components to our utility knife. The handle, the screw, the blade, the blade housing and the pack of replacement blades. Once the blade has been opened, we can remove the blade housing and blade from the knife.

Identifying the box cutter components

Make sure when you reach this point you pay attention to how the knife sits in the housing. After noting this you can remove the knife from the housing and dispose of it safely.

Replacing Blades

The replacement blades are normally wrapped in a little pack. They often come in sets of between three and five. You will want to carefully remove these blades from the knife Finding the extra blades in the utility knifehandle so you do not cut yourself. Then unwrap the blades and remove one from the package. After you have a new one out, place the other blades back into the handle.

Now take the new blade and seat it into the housing the same way the old one came out. The blades in this knife have a two notch system which needs to get placed correctly back into the housing. This creates a nice firm hold on the blade.

Putting The Box Cutter Back Together

At this point, we will want to start reassembling the box cutter. Place the blade and housing back into the handle, ensure that the extra blades are seated properly and then place the top of the handle back onto the bottom. Then fasten the screw back into place and your utility knife is as good as new.

Checking for any design in the blade of a box cutter to ensure it is seated properly.

*When fastening the screw back into place you want to make sure to snug the screw but not over-tighten it. If you over-tighten the screw it will compress the handle and seize up the blades movement in the handle. To mitigate this, tighten and then check by opening and closing the box cutter a few times to make sure it is at a comfortable resistance to opening and closing.

Our Thoughts

We are using a standard metal box cutter in our example but many blades work in the same or a very similar fashion. Utilizing these blades will end up saving your company a fortune in the long run. Make sure you educate employees on the extra blades (if available) or have an employee who can change them readily available to change blades out for the other employees. The type of box cutter we used, after spending about five minutes on it the first time, we were able to change a blade in about two minutes. Making it significantly cheaper to have someone change the blades than to just buy more.



Replacing a Utility Knife & Box Cutter Blade

How to Replace a Box Cutter Blade
Utility/Box Cutter Blade Replacement Transcript

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Bob: Welcome back to Albany County Fasteners – Fasteners 101. Today I want to show you how to properly change a blade in a utility knife. Lets get started.

So I have my utility knife here. This is just a standard utility knife. This is like a five dollar utility knife. You can get more expensive utility knives, unless you’re a contractor or or one of those guys that are using it professionally every day, this will do. This is a very simple unit.

Now I’m going to show you how to change the blade properly you need a number two Phillips and we get out of my case here. OK and i’m just going to unscrew this Phillips screw right here.

I’m gonna take that out. Remove the screw and then you just pop this top off. This whole mechanism comes out of the utility knife, like a casing, and then in the back, typically in the back of the utility knife itself, they give you a little package of additional blades. In this case they give you four extra ones.

So you take the blade out of there, you take the mechanism that it snaps into. So now, there are two holes. There’s only one you can get it into alright, so two slots they see those two slots you can only get it into one and that’s the only way will fit. It should fit snug in there, you shouldn’t get a blade that is sloppy and moves around and it should just fit perfectly as I’m showing you here.

Once you have that, you can just slide this, put it back in there, but the key to this is pushing this down so it will slide back and forth. Now when you put the top on, there’s a lot of people running into this problem. If they don’t put that in properly it won’t adjust for you and then this is like a hinge you just snap it in like that.

Before you put the screw, when you start screwing it, make sure that you have rotation; that it’s sliding back and forth for you. Put the screw back in, just snug the screw, don’t over tighten it, I just tighten it. I just tighten it till it stopped.

There you can see that it was free. A lot of times people over tighten this, put all their muscle into it and then in this case it’s not happening but in some utility knives it will not function properly.

There you go. Thanks for watching.

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How To Properly Cut, Deburr And Chamfer Threaded Stud

How To Properly Cut, Deburr and Chamfer Threaded Studcut, deburred and chamfered threaded rod

Many projects use threaded rod, also commonly called all thread, for hanging and stabilizing structures or objects. The biggest problem is that often, you can only find it in specific lengths that may not be suitable for your project. This means you will need to cut, deburr and chamfer the all-thread down to size.

To cut threaded rod down to the size you need is fairly simple but can leave some nasty burring on the end of the stud making it hard to fasten a nut onto. We sat down with our fastener expert and asked him how to cut clean threaded studs from a long bar of threaded rod.

CuttingSizing and placing all thread in a vise

The first thing to do is measure your threaded rod to length. After you have measured and marked your threaded stud, insert it into your chop saw. Some chop saws (like the evolution industrial chop saw) have a small vise for holding the material being cut, in this case all thread, in place while keeping your hands at a safe distance. Simply bring the saw down and cut through the threaded rod.

*There are two kinds of blades primarily used in chop saws. The first which we are using in our evolution chop saw is known as a cold cutting blade. This means that the blade cuts with virtually no sparks. The second kind is the old school abrasive cutting blade. We tested this process on both kinds of blades below and have found that the cold cutting blade has significantly less burring than the abrasive style blade.

The abrasive saw also generates significantly more heat which can make the threaded rod hot to the touch so wear gloves. The cold cutting blade reduces this increase in temperature significantly. Still wear gloves for safety!

Abrasive Vs Cold Cutting Chop Saw Blades

 



DeburringGrinding and deburring threaded stud

Now that you have a piece of threaded rod cut down to size, the next step is to remove and burring caused by cutting the rod, to do this you will need a grinder. Simply, take the threaded stud you cut and press the end against the grinding wheel to remove the burrs and smooth out the cut end.

Chamfering

Chamfering is the process of removing the end of the threading and cutting an angle into it. Chamfering is done to clean up the start of threads so a nut can be easily fastened to the rod. To perform this process we use a tool called the Uniburr. A Uniburr is a cone shaped tool that attaches to a drill and quickly chamfers away the edges of a fastener.

Nice Work!Chamfering Threaded Rod

Now that you have cut, deburred and chamfered your threaded stud, the only thing left to do is go use it!



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What Size Drill Bit Do I Use To Drill A Hole For A Carriage Bolt?

What Size Drill Bit Do I Use To Drill A Hole For A Carriage Bolt?

carriage bolt drill size

A common question we get when discussing carriage bolts is “What size drill bit do I use to drill a hole for a carriage bolt?” The answer is simple. Use the same size drill bit as the diameter of the bolt. If you are using a 1/2″ diameter bolt use a 1/2″ drill bit.



Installing A Carriage Bolt

Carriage bolts are very misunderstood and yet very simple to install. Made primarily for wood, carriage bolts have a square shoulder right below the head. This shoulder is designed to catch on wood and be pulled into it (by tightening the nut). Often you will find the domed head of a carriage bolt countersunk into the wood. To learn how to make a countersunk hole carriage bolt in woodyou can check out this video we made: How To Drill A Countersunk Pilot Hole.

Step One

The first thing to do when installing a carriage bolt is to determine the diameter of your carriage bolt. After you figure out the diameter with a thread gauge or other measuring tool, find a wood drill bit with the same diameter and then get your drill ready.

Step Two

Now that you have your drill bit, mark the wood and drill out the hole. Depending on the type of wood drill bit you use to make the hole, the carriage bolt may slide right into the hole or be very tight. If it is very tight grab a hammer and tap the rounded head of the bolt so it slides into the hole. *Pro Tip: Since you already have the hammer out, once the hammering in a carriage boltsquare shoulder gets down to the wood give it a couple solid hits, so the square portion begins to sink into the wood.

Step Three

Take a washer and nut and fasten them to the carriage bolt against the wood. As you tighten the nut against the washer, it will pull the square shoulder into the wood preventing it from spinning. Once the domed head of the carriage bolt is tight against the wood the carriage bolt is installed.

Conclusion

Carriage bolts are surprisingly simple to understand and yet many people still struggle with them. Hopefully this post will help you to understand which sizetightening a carriage bolt drill bit you will need and how to install a carriage bolt into wood.

 

 

 

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Self Tapping Vs. Self Drilling Screws

 Self Tapping Vs. Self Drilling Screws

self tapping screws
Self Tapping Screws have sharp cutting threads to cut into a material and create its own threading.

What Are Self Tapping Screws?

Unless you are planning on through bolting something (the process of sliding a bolt through a hole and connecting a nut to the other side to hold it in place), almost every situation involving a bolt requires a tapped hole. A tap is a tool that can be inserted into a hole after it has been drilled and creates threading for the screw to fasten into.

Self tapping screws eliminate the need for a tap by having sharp cutting threads that can tap the threading themselves while being fastened. There are two large benefits of using self tapping screws. The first is that they save time and money by eliminating the need for a tap. The second is that the resulting threading they create is much more precise and creates a tighter stronger connection. It is common to see self tapping screws used in steel and masonry materials but they can also cut into plastic or wood.

What Are Self Drilling Screws?

self drilling screws
Self drilling screws have a point that acts as a drill bit and sharp cutting threads that tap the hole during installation.

Self drilling screws are a commonly used variety of screw for quick drilling into both metal and wood. A self drilling screw can typically be identified by its point and flute (notch) tip. This tip acts as a drill bit for the screw making it much faster to install then having to switch between a drill bit and driver bit.

The notched area in the tip acts as a reservoir to receive wood chips or metal filings. This creates the space necessary to drill/screw the screw all the way into place.

Self Drilling Screws are almost always made out of hard steel or some metal that has been treated to increase its hardness (such as 410 stainless steel). Always make sure when using self drilling screws, the material you drill into is softer than the screw material itself. Otherwise, the screws drilling tip will dull and not cut into the material. All self drilling screws are also self tapping by the nature of how they work.

Self drilling screws are a time saver eliminating both the steps of drilling (in most cases) and tapping a hole prior to installation. This also eliminates the need for drill bits and taps and switching between them for each hole.

*While these screws are able to drill their own holes, we still recommend using a standard drill bit first especially when going through very thin wood. This step will limit the amount chance of splitting/cracking significantly.



Self Drilling Vs Self Tapping: Which Is Better?

In the world of fasteners, the usual answer for which is better comes down almost entirely to the situation the fastener is being used for. From a time saving point of view, a self drilling screw is the better choice because it can eliminate the need for a drill bit making installations a one step process. However, both have their place and it comes down to knowing which to use in the situation at hand.

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When To Use Fasteners Over Welds

Welds Or Fasteners?

A confusing subject to say the least. Welding is a common practice that creates a physical and (what is considered to be) permanent connection. Fasteners (for our discussion bolts) create a joint which is considered to be a temporary connection.

But, which is better? Is there a definitive answer to this question? The answer is: It depends. There are always situations in which welds or fasteners will end up on top. The harder part is trying to determine when to use one or the other. Today we are going to look at why you might think twice before starting a weld.

Why Welds Are Great (And Why They Are Not)

Welding is an excellent way to make a permanent joint between two materials. It is one of those set it and forget it types of connections, but what happens over time as that weld is put under stress? How do you know if the joint is still as strong as on day one?

The answer is welds are often harder to check and maintain than fasteners. Some of the special equipment required for weld testing costs excessive amounts of money. Welds require some intensive tests such as x-rays to check integrity throughout the weld. Welds are also considerably harder to remove and replace than fasteners. They can also be inconsistent in strength along a joint.



What May Make Fasteners A Better Decision

Fasteners are used for creating temporary joints. Fasteners, installed at equal distances, will provide the same strength at each joint without significant change. This makes them a better choice for weight distribution. They are also simple to check for corrosion or other weakening factors.

By far the best part about using a fastener over a weld is that if a fastener is bad, it is simple to remove it and replace it with a new one. They can also be adjusted over time to compensate for changes in the materials such as swelling or shrinking with minimal effort.

Welds and Fasteners

It really comes down to the application to truly determine if a weld or fastener is right for you. Ultimately, we think the majority of situations that can use both should use fasteners because it just makes maintenance easier.

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