Finishing Cup Washers Install

Create A Clean Look With Finish Washers

Finishing cup washers are indented washers used with either oval or flat head screws. These washers are designed to create a flush finish, often seen on furniture.

Installing Finishing Cup Washers

The installation of these washers is very simple. There are two basic types of these washers. The photo on the left shows a standard black oxide cup washer and the photo on the right shows a stainless steel cup washer with a flange around the outside.

finishing cup washers              stainless steel finish cup washers

Installation

When installing these washers it is important to only snug them. These washers do not sit perfectly upon the installation material and over-tightening them will begin to distort their shape.

brass cup washers  installing finishing cup washers

The Finished Product

Once installed you can see that finish cup washers create a very clean look around a screw head making it appear to be intentionally exposed, instead of just sticking out.

installed finishing cup washers

Albany County Fasteners carries a variety of these washers in many different materials to help you find the right tool for the job. Check out Finishing Cup Washers page to see our selection of cup washers.



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Installing Wedge Anchors

Installing Wedge Anchors in Concrete

Wedge anchors are fasteners designed for use in masonry materials (most commonly concrete) and used to secure materials and equipment. Concrete wedge anchors are designed to go into a pre-drilled hole and expand, creating a grip so they cannot be “pulled out” or removed. Today we will be reviewing the proper installation of a post base into a concrete floor.



What will you need?

Before we begin let’s make sure we have the proper tools for the job.

Step One

The first thing you need to do when installing a wedge anchor is choose the proper anchor material. Wedge anchors come in many materials and all serve different purposes. Stainless steel and hot dip galvanized are two very popular wedge anchor materials, but the correct material varies by application. Not sure what material you need? Check out our Material Guide to learn about all the different materials available.

wedge anchors

Step Two

Once you’ve chosen a material, its time to get your drill ready. When installing a wedge anchor, it’s important to have a minimum of 2-1/2 inches embedded into the concrete. There should also be at least an inch exposed, enough for the attaching material to grab onto. To measure ours, we placed the wedge anchor about an inch below the tip of the SDS drill bit and then used blue painters tape to mark off the drill where we should stop drilling.  Marking the stop point with blue tape will allow you to drill consistent holes and prevent you from over/under drilling.

Step Three

drilling into concrete

Now that we’ve applied our drill bit with tape, its time to begin the drilling. BUT NOT SO FAST. First we need to put on our safety goggles and gloves, always wear safety gear when cutting. Now that you are safe and ready to work, simply apply pressure to the place you want to drill and let the bit begin to do its work. Once your drill bit reaches the blue painters tape, you will know that the hole has reached the necessary depth and you can stop drilling.

Step Four

hammering in wedge anchorsCarefully brush away any of the debris from drilling to clear the hole and begin installation of the anchor. The next step is to insert the masonry anchor into the hole. It should be a very tight fit and will need to be hammered into place. The end result should leave about an inch (or more depending on how much room you need) above the surface to allow for anchoring.

wedge anchor ready for post base

Now that the anchor is installed we can apply the post base, square washer, and nut to the wedge anchor. After placing them on, you screw the nut onto the wedge anchor creating a strong, sturdy anchoring station. Now that you’ve completed the installation, take a step back and admire your handiwork. This post base is now ready for the next step in your building project.

ratcheting on postbase                     Anchored postbase

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Lock Nuts and Lock Washers

Locking Fasteners

Locking fasteners come in many varieties and styles to help keep your fastener assemblies secure and resist loosen from vibration. Locking nuts and washers are great tools to keep assemblies from accidental loosening, basically they stop things from falling apart! But what kind of locking nut or washer should you buy? Below we explain some of the popular types to help you choose.

Lock Washers

Lock washers are are washers with designed changes to add extra friction or tension to your fastener assembly to prevent loosening. Each lock washer is engineered to work for different applications, if you are unsure if the hardware you are selecting is appropriate, make sure to consult an engineer.

Click the name of any type of lock washer or nut you would like to know more about or buy directly from our website.

Lock Washer Type Description Image

External Tooth

“External Star”

External tooth lock washers are serrated and create tension between the teeth and the installation surface. This increased tension can make it harder for a fastener assembly to vibrate loose.
Internal Tooth
“Internal Star”
Internal tooth lock washers have bent teeth that are designed to create tension and friction on the inside of a bolt head or against the nut. They are often chosen over external tooth lock washers due to their cleaner finish. internal tooth lock washer
High Collar Split Ring High collar lock washers are similar to regular split ring washers except they are made to fit under the head of a socket cap screw. They have a smaller outer diameter designed to fit into a counter-bored hole. high collar split ring lock washer
Split Ring Split ring lock washers are washers with a cut in them and bent into a helicoil shape. As the nut loosens, extra pressure is applied from the expanding lock washer which can stop a bolt from loosening unintentionally split ring lock washer



Lock Nuts

Lock nuts are nuts that have been altered in some way to deter them from vibrating loose. Below are a few of the more common types of lock nuts you are likely to come across.

Lock Nut Type Description Image
Castle Castle nuts, while not technically lock nuts, can function as lock nuts after installation. They require that a cotter pin be placed through a hole in a bolt and through the crown of the nut. We consider these to be lock nuts because the cotter pin will hold the nut in place if it comes loose. Castle Nut
Flange Serrated Flange serrated nuts have one wide side that acts as an integrated washer. The washer side has serrations which, when tightened, can help prevent loosening by adding extra friction to the assembly. Serrated Flange Lock Nut
Keps-K Keps K lock nuts Have an attached spinning washer with teeth that can dig into the assembly. They are similar to that of an external tooth lock washer combined with a nut. Keps K lock nut
Nylon Insert Nylon insert lock nuts are a taller nut with the same nylon insert. Threads cut into the insert as installed resulting in a better grip to help prevent a fastener assembly vibrate loose. Nylon Insert Lock Nut
Nylon Jam “Thin” Nylon Jam lock nuts are a low profile nut that have an internal nylon insert. As the bolt is screwed on the threads cut into the nylon holding them in place and preventing vibrations from loosening them. Nylon Jam Nut
“Stover” Cone Prevailing Torque Stover lock nuts have chamfered corners. The distortion in the top threads from the shape of the bolt create resistance to loosening. This is a better choice for high heat applications because no nylon insert is used. Stover Nut
Two Way Reversible Two way reversible lock nuts have indents on the outside flats of the nut causing distortions of the internal threading. These distortions create resistance of the mating part. two way reversible lock nuts

NOTE: We also offer thread locker solutions that can provide a low, medium or high level grip to prevent assemblies from loosening as well.



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Fastener Acronyms

Fastener Acronyms

Fastener Acronyms can be confusing but they are a constant in the fastener world. At Albany County Fasteners we want to make your experience as simple as possible. To help you better find what you need, we have compiled a list of commonly used acronyms, what they stand for and what they mean.

Machine screws are mostly available in smaller sizes, these screws have a flat point and can be driven into a pre-tapped hole or used with a nut.UNJC+UNJFComparable to UNC and UNFSimilar to UNC and UNF in both external and internal threading. External threading on these have a much larger root radius. These larger roots lead to increased tensile stress and as a result, make them stronger. Below is a list of most of the fastener acronyms you are likely to come across.




Acronym – Term Description
AN
Aeronautical Standards Group
Precedes the dimensional specifications developed by the Aeronautical Standards Group.
ANSI
American National Standard Institute
The American National Standard Institute (founded 1918) was formed to create a national standard for sizing.
ASME
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (founded 1881) was created to pursue research, education and improvement of the industry while also placing a strong emphasis on public safety.
ASTM
American Society for Testing & Materials
The American Society for Testing & Materials (founded 1898) aims to promote safety and health by sharing information about the reliability of different aspects in the manufacturing industry.
CS
Countersink
A drilled hole with a wider rim so that a screw or bolt can sit inside that area and be flush with the surface it is installed into.
DIN
Deutsches Institut Für Normung
Din, 1917, is the German institute for standardization. They focus on the technical and scientific creation of technical standards.
En-Standards (CEN)
European Committee of Standardization
CEN was created to be a mediator between the European Union and European Free Trade Association. They were to pass resolutions which both parties must adhere to.
FT
Fully Threaded
Threading that starts at the tip of the screw and goes all the way to the undercut of the head.
GR
Grade
A level of material that describes its composition.
HDG
Hot Dip Galvanized
A process that adds a layer of corrosion resistance by dipping fabricated steel into a kettle containing molten zinc.
IFI
Industrial Fastener Institute
Founded in 1931, the Industrial Fastener Institute is an association who supports standards for the mechanical fastener industry. They often develop standards when one does not exist until a national standard can be provided.
ISO
International Organization for Standardization
The ISO, is a federation of 158 countries from all over the world. Based in Switzerland, they propose, develop and implement new standards and then deliver them to the world.
LF
Large Flange
A wider surface area, often with a much greater outer diameter, than the typical surface area. Ex: Large Flange Washers.
MS
Military Standards
Standardized objectives created by the U.S. Department of Defense.
Prop 65
California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act
A warning label that protects Californians from chemicals which can cause long-term health defects.
PT
Partially Threaded
Threading that starts at the tip of a screw and stops at some point allowing for the screw or bolt to have a shoulder.
REACH
Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals
A European regulation created to test and determine if chemicals are safe and can be used.
RoHS
Restriction of certain Hazardous Substances
RoHS is a directive to restrict hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. Any fastener that is a component of electrical parts and placed on the European Union market must adhere to this restriction.
SAE
Society of Automotive Engineers
A society, founded in 1905, to test and create standards for the automotive industry. They also develop standards for heavy-duty and aerospace vehicles.
SD
Self Driller or Self Drilling Screws
Primarily used to drill into steel and join materials such as sheet metal today.
SEMS
Pre-assembled Screws
Pre-made screw and washer assemblies.
SLT
Slotted
A common drive style which is also commonly called a flat head.
SMS
Sheet Metal Screws
Sharp threaded screws used to cut into soft metals, wood or plastics.
UN
Thread Sizing
A series of threading for applications where UNC, UNF, UNEF and UNS are not applicable.
UNEF
Unified National Extra Fine
Threads even smaller than fine threading these extra fine threads are commonly used on very small screws to make the screw stronger.
UNC
Unified National Coarse
Coarse threading that is the prefered thread for general use.
UNF
Unified National Fine
Fine threading that is not as strong as coarse threading. They do offer finer adjustments than coarse threads.
UNR
Unified Round
The root radius must be rounded but does not necessarily have to be inspected.
UNS
Unified Special
Threads that are tip(threads per inch) specified but are limited to a specific diameter.

There are many fastener abbreviations, not all of which are listed here. Please let us know in the comments below which acronyms we forgot and help us to create a more informed fastener community!



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How To Install T Nuts

What Are T Nuts

How To Install T Nuts

In this post we will discuss how to install t nuts. T Nuts, aka “Tee Nuts”, have flanges on a thin surface of the nut, often available with three or four “prongs.” These flanges act as hooks and are pulled into the material when the bolt is threaded into the nut. These nuts require a pre-drilled hole to use and can be serrated to provide a better grip.

T nuts are designed to be used with a softer material such as wood or composite. T nuts are a very unusual looking nut, due to the prong design. It can be intimidating to see one of these nuts and realize you have no idea what to do with it. T nuts are great for creating a flush finish on the nut side of wood. You can browse our T Nut stock here.

Before You Begin The Install

Before we discuss how to install a t nut, you must first get the proper tools for the job. You will need a bolt, a t nut that matches the bolt, a washer and a power drill with the proper sized drill bit.



How to Install T Nuts

Step 1: Drill The Hole

Placing The T Nut Into Wood

The first step in installing a T nut is to drill a hole straight through the material. The hole diameter should be just large enough for the cylinder of the nut to fit through. Then sit the nut into the hole. It will not slide all the way in, is should simply rest in the hole.

 

Step 2: Connecting The Bolt

Screwing In The T Nut

On the other side of the material, slide the washer onto the bolt, slide the bolt threads through the drilled hole and begin hand threading the bolt onto the nut. The washer will help you distribute the pressure of the bolt and keep the material from being damaged. It is important to hold the washer in place during this process so it can start to grip the wood.

Step 3: Tighten The Bolt

Once the screw is hand threaded (screwed on by hand until it is firmly connected), it is time to take a wrench or socket and continue to drive the bolt. This tightening will pull the flanges of the T nut into the wood creating a snug and secure hold. Continue driving the bolt until the T-nut is firmly pulled all the way into the material and the bolt tightens. If the bolt is too long it will stick out significantly from the other side and can be removed so a shorter bolt that creates a flush finish can be installed.  Do not over tighten.

T Nut Flanges Holding Themselves In Place

T Nut Pulling Into The Wood

Fully Installed T Nut

Signs Of Improper Installation:

Some materials (when installed), such as stainless steel, can cause what is known as thread galling. A process where the threads heat up from friction and cause fusion to occur. This can be seen if the T nut you are trying to install cannot be loosened or tightened easily or if the T nut simply spins without properly gripping into the wood. To protect this from happening, Anti-seize lubrication is recommended to minimize friction and make install a breeze.


In This Video:

Our Fastener Expert shows us how to install a t-nut into wood.



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